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Why Isn’t Boxing a High School Sport ?

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boxing3Boxing is a sport that has a long of lineage around the globe, since the early 16th century in Russia. Boxing evolved from 16th- and 18th-century prizefights, largely in Great Britain, to the forerunner of modern boxing in the mid-19th century, again initially in Great Britain and later in the United States.

Boxing is considered as a “defend sport.” It also has its certain fame, particularly as an Olympic sport. Boxing has a large audience as it, quite frankly, makes for great entertainment and great gambling. But the problem is, why isn’t it a high school sport?

I’ve always wondered about that. I think it should be a high school sport. Through boxing, we could not only teach our young students about self defense, but also try and take American boxing to the next level. We could use boxing to control the rage and the violence that are common for some students, as it would be a good solution for the fights that erupt too often among teenagers. Football, the king of American high school sports, can be just as physical as amateur boxing.

In the last decades, boxing has lost fame in America. It gradually slips into the obsolete. Day by day, we see less people taking boxing classes or getting interested in the sport. If we  take a look into boxing, and we look for the proposed future champions, the majority are from Russia. We don’t have Americans part of the challenge. Our actual champion is Floyd Mayweather, but there are no more Americans following him, fighting for the title.

There is a boxing crisis in America, and, in my opinion, introducing it to high school students is a way to rescue it. Not only can high schools help boxing, but boxing can in turn help save them: it teaches discipline, and reduce the street fight epidemic among teenagers.

The American Athletic Association boxing team captured the team title at the Eastern Michigan Junior Golden Gloves tournament in Birch Run for 2010. Pictured are, front row, Brenden Mulligan, Devin Tomkins and Dakota Leinberger and, back row, Tristin Morse, Dakota Lowe and Brian Hacker.

The American Athletic Association boxing team captured the team title at the Eastern Michigan Junior Golden Gloves tournament in Birch Run for 2010. Pictured are, front row, Brenden Mulligan, Devin Tomkins and Dakota Leinberger and, back row, Tristin Morse, Dakota Lowe and Brian Hacker.

 

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Why Isn’t Boxing a High School Sport ?