Ace It For God!

Amanda Arcy

Tennis starts with "Love"!

Amanda Arcy, Staff Writer
January 22, 2012

As it is said in the National Catholic Register, In the Roman Ritual, the introduction to it explains: 1024 “This blessing is intended for those who participate in an athletic event. The blessing asks that God may protect the athletes from injury and that throughout the event they may show respect for one another.” As that reads, I infer that God does not care whether you win or lose, but he does care upon your actions. Also, he cares about your safety through your sports as of you are an athlete.
Not many people who play sports may think of their faith throughout their event. The athlete may want to be asking God for their safety or even to help them win. God does not want to choose a side by helping one over the other to win. God cares of all people no matter whom they are.
I will be writing about Tennis, and whether God cares who wins a Tennis meet. I have interviewed my tennis coach, Ryan Carlson, and a tennis player whom is on the Boys Varsity Team, Monty Wonnacott. As I asked both of them if God cares about winning, their both responses were no and an explanation. Monty Wonnacott stated, “No, God may be watching all people but he does not care about the outcome. He cares that people have fun and enjoys playing.”
If the player is Catholic, he or she may not always think of God while playing or at anytime during the sport event. Some people may not pray before they play because they have their own pregame ritual, such as listening to music and meditating to get pumped up. On the other hand, the sports team may have a team player they say before each event. The Divine Child Girl’s Tennis Team has a team prayer they say before each meet and tournament. This prayer has been passed down through the team for approximately ten years.
If a sports athlete gets hurt, do you think they should ask God for help? According to Carlson, it is not the first thing he thinks of because his main concern at that moment is to figure out if the person is seriously injured. Once they know what the exact problem is, he will say a short prayer in his head asking God to watch over the player and help them to a speedy recovery. Others may not ask of God for help because they are so worried about themselves and scared that something could seriously be wrong.
A few of Divine Child’s teams have a cross on their uniforms to symbolize themselves as belonging to a Catholic School. People may think it is important that the players portray the aspects of being from a Catholic school and should always strive to achieve a great sense of sportsmanship, ethics and morals before, during and after each of our events. But they may also agree  with what Carlson had to say, “Although many players may pray to a God during their pregame rituals and some teams may say a prayer, not everyone believes in the same God. By having a cross on the uniform, you would be disrespecting others who may be of a different religion. Even in a Catholic school, you still have students who may not be Catholic or Christen and although we stress the importance of God in our lives, not everyone follows that.”
As Tim Tebow may kneel on one knee and bow his head to celebrate a touchdown, many players do some kind of gesture to celebrate a winning of a point or game. There are many pro tennis players that thank God after winning their matches. Some do it by making the sign of the cross after their match, some do it by pointing up to the sky, but there are also many players who do not do anything after their wins. Some players find it appalling that a player would think that God “wanted” them to win.

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